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Harvest Moon Investments, LLC

Think Deeper

  • Established in 2007, Harvest Moon Investments is a multifaceted business solutions provider, specializing in B2B, government contracting, e-commerce, and educational video content creation. We are committed to delivering exceptional service, fostering open communication, and building enduring relationships built on trust and mutual respect. We empower individuals and businesses to achieve their goals by providing valuable insights and actionable strategies.

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    Q&A — Video Answer

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  • 1:1 Coaching Session

    1:1 Session — 1 hour

    $79.98

  • 12 Steps to Better Personal Credit

    System Checklist

    $24.98

  • Here are the top 20 side hustles for 2024:

    1. Freelancing

    2. Pet Sitting and Doggie Day Care

    3. Dog Walking

    4. Tech Setup Services

    5. Blogging

    6. Senior Sitting and Companion

    7. Babysitting and Child Care

    8. Personal Assistant

    9. Mobile Car Washing and Detailing

    10. Local Handyman

    11. Virtual Assistant

    12. Sell at Local Markets and Festivals

    13. Tutoring and Instruction

    14. Self-publishing Ebooks

    15. Online Courses and Coaching

    16. Digital Product Sales

    17. YouTube Channel

    18. Influencer Marketing

    19. Create a Podcast

    20. Take Online Surveys

    These side hustles offer a range of opportunities for individuals to earn extra income, from pet care and tech services to creative pursuits like blogging and self-publishing.

  • 8 Steps to Effectively Handle Debt Collectors

    1. Verify the debt: Request proof of the debt and verify that it is yours and the amount is accurate.

    2. Know your rights: Familiarize yourself with the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and your state's laws to understand what debt collectors can and cannot do.

    3. Communicate in writing: Request that the debt collector communicate with you in writing, and keep records of all correspondence.

    4. Set boundaries: Inform the debt collector of your preferred contact times and methods, and request that they cease contact if you feel harassed.

    5. Seek validation: Request that the debt collector validate the debt, which means they must provide proof that the debt is yours and the amount is accurate.

    6. Don't admit fault: Avoid admitting fault or making promises to pay that you may not be able to keep.

    7. Report violations: File a complaint with the CFPB or your state's attorney general if you believe a debt collector has violated the FDCPA.

    8. Seek professional help: Consider hiring a credit counselor or attorney if you're overwhelmed or need assistance navigating the process.

  • 10 Tips Everyone SHOULD Know to Improve Your Credit:

    1. Pay your bills on time

    2. Keep your credit utilization ratio low (less than 30%)

    3. Monitor your credit report and dispute errors

    4. Don't open too many credit accounts

    5. Pay down debt, especially high-interest debt

    6. Build a credit history by having a mix of credit types (e.g., credit cards, loans)

    7. Avoid negative marks like collections and bankruptcies

    8. Be patient and consistent - building good credit takes time

    9. Consider a secured credit card or credit builder loan to start building credit

    10. Keep old accounts open to show a longer credit history

    Remember, improving credit takes time and effort, but following these tips can help you achieve better credit over time!

  • What is more important? A Credit Report or Credit Profile?

    A credit report and credit profile are two different things, but they are related.

    A credit report is a detailed document that contains information about your credit history, including payment history, credit utilization, credit mix, and new credit inquiries. This report is generated by the three major credit reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

    On the other hand, a credit profile refers to the information contained in your credit report that is used to calculate your credit score. This includes information like payment history, credit utilization, and credit age.

    In essence, your credit report contains all the information about your credit history, while your credit profile is a summary of that information used to calculate your credit score.

    So, while both are important, your credit report is more comprehensive and detailed, while your credit profile is a condensed version that highlights the key factors that affect your credit score.

  • What is a Credit Report?

    A credit report is a detailed document that contains information about your credit history and current credit status. It is prepared by credit reporting agencies, also known as credit bureaus, which collect and maintain information about your credit accounts and payment history. The three major credit reporting agencies in the United States are Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

    A credit report typically includes the following information:

    1. Personal information: Your name, address, date of birth, and Social Security number.

    2. Credit accounts: A list of your open and closed credit accounts, including credit cards, loans, and mortgages. This includes the account balance, payment history, and credit limit.

    3. Payment history: A record of your payments, including any late payments, missed payments, or accounts sent to collections.

    4. Credit utilization: The amount of credit you're using compared to the amount available to you.

    5. Credit age: The length of time you've had credit accounts.

    6. Credit mix: The variety of credit types you have, such as credit cards, installment loans, and mortgages.

    7. New credit inquiries: A record of recent applications for credit, including the date and type of credit applied for.

    8. Public records: Information about any bankruptcies, foreclosures, or tax liens.

    9. Credit scores: Your credit score, which is a numerical summary of your creditworthiness, based on the information in your credit report.

    Credit reports are used by lenders, landlords, employers, and others to evaluate your creditworthiness and make decisions about lending, renting, or hiring. You can request a free copy of your credit report from each of the three major credit reporting agencies once a year through (link unavailable). Reviewing your credit report regularly can help you identify and correct errors, and improve your overall financial health.

  • What is a Credit Profile?

    A credit profile is a summary of the information contained in your credit report that is used to evaluate your creditworthiness. It includes the following information:

    1. Personal information: Your name, address, date of birth, and Social Security number.

    2. Credit accounts: A list of your open and closed credit accounts, including credit cards, loans, and mortgages.

    3. Payment history: Your history of making on-time or late payments, including any accounts sent to collections.

    4. Credit utilization: The amount of credit you're using compared to the amount available to you.

    5. Credit age: The length of time you've had credit accounts.

    6. Credit mix: The variety of credit types you have, such as credit cards, installment loans, and mortgages.

    7. New credit inquiries: A record of recent applications for credit.

    8. Credit score: A numerical score that represents your creditworthiness, based on the information in your credit profile.

    Your credit profile is important because it helps lenders and creditors evaluate your creditworthiness and decide whether to approve you for credit or a loan. It also influences the interest rates and terms you're offered. By maintaining a positive credit profile, you can demonstrate responsible credit behavior and improve your access to credit and better financial opportunities.

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  • Here's the Steps to Properly Setup a Business:

    Step 1: Choose a Business Structure

    * Determine the type of business structure you want to form (e.g. corporation, limited liability company (LLC), partnership, etc.)

    Step 2: Choose a Business Name

    * Choose a unique and memorable name for your business

    * Check if the name is available and complies with your state's requirements

    Step 3: Obtain an EIN (Employer Identification Number)

    * Apply for an EIN from the IRS

    * This is a unique number assigned to your business for tax purposes

    Step 4: File Articles of Incorporation or Articles of Organization

    * File articles of incorporation for a corporation or articles of organization for an LLC with your state's Secretary of State office

    * This document includes basic information about your business, such as its name, purpose, and management structure

    Step 5: Create an Operating Agreement (for LLCs only)

    * An operating agreement outlines the ownership structure, management, and operating procedures of an LLC

    * This document is legally binding among members and can help prevent disputes

    Step 6: Obtain Licenses and Permits

    * Obtain any necessary licenses and permits to operate your business legally

    * Requirements vary by state and industry

    Step 7: Create a Business Bank Account

    * Open a separate bank account for your business to keep personal and business finances separate

    Step 8: Obtain Business Insurance

    * Consider obtaining insurance to protect your business from potential risks and liabilities

    Step 9: Establish Business Credit

    * Apply for business credit cards or lines of credit to establish a credit history for your business

    * Use credit responsibly to build a strong credit score and improve financing options

    Step 10: Monitor and Build Business Credit

    * Regularly check your business credit report and score

    * Make timely payments and maintain a good credit utilization ratio to build a strong credit history

    By following these steps, you can successfully form a business and establish a solid foundation for it's future growth.

  • Every business should consider hiring the following key staff:

    1. Accountant/Bookkeeper: To manage financial records, taxes, and budgeting.

    2. Sales and Marketing Professionals: To drive revenue growth and brand awareness.

    3. Customer Service Representative: To provide excellent customer support and retain customers.

    4. Operations Manager: To oversee day-to-day operations, streamline processes, and manage logistics.

    5. Human Resources Manager: To handle employee relations, recruitment, and benefits administration.

    6. IT Support Specialist: To manage technology infrastructure, troubleshoot issues, and ensure data security.

    7. Legal Counsel: To provide guidance on contracts, compliance, and legal matters.

    8. Data Analyst: To analyze and interpret data to inform business decisions.

    9. Project Manager: To lead and manage projects, ensure timely completion, and allocate resources.

    10. Administrative Assistant: To provide administrative support, coordinate tasks, and maintain office operations.

    Note: The specific staffing needs may vary depending on the industry, size, and goals of the business.

  • The Importance of Building Business Credit

    Building business credit is a crucial step in establishing a strong financial foundation for your company. Just like personal credit, business credit represents your company's creditworthiness and ability to repay debts. Having a good business credit score can open doors to new opportunities, such as better loan terms and increased credibility with vendors and suppliers. In contrast, poor business credit can limit your growth and lead to higher interest rates and reduced negotiating power.

    Building business credit starts with establishing a separate legal entity, such as an LLC or corporation, and obtaining a federal tax ID number. From there, you can start building credit by opening trade accounts with vendors, paying bills on time, and keeping credit utilization low. It's also important to monitor your credit report and resolve any errors or disputes.

    In addition to these basics, there are other strategies you can use to build strong business credit. For example, you can consider establishing a business credit card or applying for a small business loan. You can also work on building a positive payment history by paying your bills early or taking advantage of discounts for early payment.

    Another key aspect of building business credit is understanding how credit scoring works. There are several different credit scoring models used for business credit, including the FICO SBSS score and the PAYDEX score. By understanding how these scores are calculated, you can take steps to improve your credit profile and increase your chances of approval for loans and credit lines.

    Finally, it's important to remember that building business credit takes time and effort. It's not something that can be done overnight, but with consistent and responsible financial management, you can establish a strong credit profile that will serve your business well for years to come. By following these tips and staying committed to building your business credit, you can unlock new opportunities for growth and success.

  • Here are some business credit lines available for new small businesses:

    1. Bluevine - Offers a line of credit up to $250,000 with no prepayment penalties or fees.

    2. Fundbox - Provides a line of credit up to $150,000 with flexible repayment terms.

    3. Kabbage - Offers a line of credit up to $250,000 with no origination fees or prepayment penalties.

    4. OnDeck - Provides a line of credit up to $100,000 with flexible repayment terms.

    5. Fundation - Offers a line of credit up to $100,000 with no prepayment penalties or fees.

    6. LendingClub - Provides a line of credit up to $50,000 with no prepayment penalties or fees.

    7. American Express Business Line of Credit - Offers a line of credit up to $100,000 with no interest charges if paid in full within 30 days.

    8. Wells Fargo BusinessLine - Provides a line of credit up to $100,000 with no annual fee or interest charges if paid in full within 30 days.

    9. Bank of America Business Line of Credit - Offers a line of credit up to $100,000 with no annual fee or interest charges if paid in full within 30 days.

    10. Chase Business Line of Credit - Provides a line of credit up to $100,000 with no annual fee or interest charges if paid in full within 30 days.

    It's essential to note that the availability and terms of these credit lines may vary based on your business's creditworthiness and other factors. It's recommended to research and compare the terms and conditions of each option before applying.

  • Becoming a government contractor can be a challenging but rewarding process. Here are the steps to follow:

    1. Register your business: Obtain a Dun & Bradstreet number and register your business in the System for Award Management (SAM).

    2. Get an EIN: Apply for an Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the IRS.

    3. Obtain necessary certifications: Consider obtaining certifications such as Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB), Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), or Minority Business Enterprise (MBE).

    4. Research government contracting opportunities: Utilize resources like FedBizOpps, (link unavailable), and the Small Business Administration's (SBA) Contracting Guide to find opportunities.

    5. Develop a capabilities statement: Create a document highlighting your company's skills, expertise, and experience.

    6. Network and build relationships: Attend industry events, conferences, and trade shows to connect with government agencies and prime contractors.

    7. Understand government contracting regulations: Familiarize yourself with the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and other relevant regulations.

    8. Pursue small business set-asides: Look for opportunities reserved for small businesses, such as 8(a) or HUBZone programs.

    9. Team with other businesses: Consider partnering with other companies to increase your chances of winning contracts.

    10. Develop a strong proposal: Invest time and effort into crafting a compelling proposal that meets the government's requirements.

    11. Be persistent: Winning government contracts can take time, so be prepared to face rejection and keep pursuing opportunities.